See our new ‘Credentials’ presentation

April 25th, 2017

PROMOTIONAL PRESENTATION

Up to three quarters of customer data held within marketing databases in UK organisations will become “useless” when the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is introduced, according to a new study.

August 14th, 2017

‘OK Google, start the survey’

July 17th, 2017

Radio interview with Cambridge Marketing College on Thomas HPTI (High Potential Trait Indicator) Assessments

July 6th, 2017


The second part of my radio interview with Kiran Kapur, CEO of Cambridge Marketing College. This time I am talking about the Thomas International HPTI (High Performance Trait Indicator) assessment, which identifies leadership potential by exploring personality traits. The second part of the programme looks at marketing communication with the millennial generation.

Be ready for May

June 28th, 2017

We are delivering one day courses on the likely impact of GDPR and PECR next May.
For more information please click here

TO BE BRIEF…

June 5th, 2017

In our role as marketing researchers we see briefs in all shapes and sizes. Research briefs, I hasten to add.

With the massive changes we are seeing in the world of marketing research driven by the growth in: available data; engagement channels; user generated content; new methods; new technologies; analytics; concerns over privacy and so on, it is a source of bemusement at times that written research briefs are still often scant, lacking in key information, with unclear objectives or not done at all.

This may sound like a criticism of clients and prospective clients but it really isn’t. It is just surprising that the briefing process seems to be so difficult to get right.

When teaching the subject, I always say

“Without a good brief it is nearly impossible to get a good proposal”.

In the absence of a written brief we will often write one for the client and get agreement to it prior to delivering a proposal.

So here are my five key tips for writing that all important research brief:

1. State the purpose – what decisions do you need to take as a result of the research and why do they need to be taken?

2. Write a ‘shopping list’ – what information do you need to receive at the end of the research process to make those decisions? Writing a brief in this way short circuits the process of arriving at research objectives and enables the researcher or agency to deliver that information through the proposed method(s).

3. Consider the research scope – which products, services, markets, customers, clients, prospects, geographies, demographics etc. need to be researched and why – if not clear from 1. above?

4. Outline your preferred method – what are your thoughts on the method that could be used? In general, most marketers have an initial view on how the research might be undertaken, via what channels and this can be a very good guide for developing the proposal.

5. Think about timing and cost – When is the research needed by? Yes, I know “ASAP” but think about the latest date by which the results must be available to make the decisions detailed in 1?
Also, giving at least a rough guide on likely budget and insisting that the proposed costs are fully broken down so that you can see where your money would be spent is really worth considering.

Good luck with creating effective research briefs.

Small but mighty: the power of passion communities

June 2nd, 2017

5 Leadership TED talks that will inspire you

June 2nd, 2017

Profiling under the GDPR: potential implications for advertising and marketing

May 25th, 2017

GLOBAL NGOS URGE FACEBOOK TO DISCLOSE PSYCHOLOGICAL INSIGHTS ON TEENS

May 11th, 2017

AD EXPENDITURE HITS £21.4BN IN 2016

April 25th, 2017